Western Australian Intelligence Forum – Making Sense of a Changing World

Thursday 26th November 2015

The Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers is offering professional in the security industry a rare opportunity to hear from some of the intelligence industry’s leading practitioners on cutting edge practices in areas such as:

Cybercrime in financial markets

AML challenges – shaping current and future impacts Methods and tools supporting analysts

Understanding the nature and dimensions of rapid change

To register online please visit www.aipio.asn.au

This years conference will be held at The University of Notre Dame, Fremantle WA 6959

Participants will have the opportunity to directly engage with speakers and panel members during and after the forum, to discuss issues related to their intelligence practice. Attendees will include those who work in the intelligence community (law enforcement, defence, regulation and financial services), those currently studying in the field and those who aspire to work in the intelligence profession.

Current speakers include:

  • Major General John Hartley AO (ret’d): The Future: A Changing World with Different Threats
  • Nolan Dedrick: AML Challenges
  • Jeff Corkill: Diagnosis & communication, the keys to successful intelligence in any world
  • Chris Cubbage: Technology, Crime & the Future
  • Steve Simpson: The Shadow IT Threat: trends and challenges
  • An expert panel including Professor Matthew Ogilvie: Intelligence and Intelligent responses to threats in a changing world
  • Colonel Michael Brennan: Regional Peacekeeping: Perspectives on the East Timor and Bougainville Operations 1999-2012

For more information about pricing or to register for the event, please visit www.aipio.asn.au

If, for any reason, you are unable to register online, or for more information please contact WA AIPIO Regional Representative Daniel Baldino wa.rep2@aipio.asn.au (+61 8 9433 0127) or Jess Reidy marketing@aipio.asn.au

AIPIO Events operate under the Chatham House Rule: Under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speakers, nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.